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bpep1953

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Why is my score not excellent with 2 chg. cards at 0% ???
The house is not in my name, either!!!

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First of all charge cards don't factor into revolving utilization.

If you mean credit cards then you don't want all of your cards reporting 0 balances.

Finally, while revolving utilization is a signifcant scoring and risk factor it is far from the only factor that impacts your scores.  If you want feedback we need a lot more information about the rest of your credit profile as well.  Odds are that other factors are holding you down.

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If your cards are not being utilized, that's going to cause a bad score. Even just charging 5 bucks on each card a month, and having a bill drop for that amount, then paying it off by the due date - and repeating that each month - Will help.  0% utilization is rated as bad as having 50 % utilization of your cards. You really need to have some usage showing - but keep it under 20 percent. You will see your score grow 

Also - It's hard to understand the second part of your post - Hopefully, you know this is just a forum of fellow credit minded people, and not a direct line to Credit Karma or the Credit Bureaus.... But - If you are saying you are showing a Mortgage under your name that shouldn't be - then for that, You need to contact the bank or financial institution in question, and have them remove you from whatever is reporting (Do this in writing, btw. as the rules surrounding what a Bank has to do about Credit Reporting are only really in effect if your question or dispute is in writing) . But - If you have signed a mortgage, even if the house isn't in your name - then you would be liable for that mortgage. 

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Pharkus

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Depends on when creditor reports balance to bureaus.   It is usually week or more  before your payment is due.   So say you almost maxed out your limit on a purchase but pay off by due date.   If report goes to bureau before you pay it off,  you will show almost 100% utilization on that card even if you have zero balance when cycle ends.  You should keep track of how much you have charged during the cycle and never have that total go over 10-20% of limit.  If you make big purchase,  make a big paymrnt on card immediately so you don't get caught with high utilization when reported to bureau. 

It is fiction that a zero balance at end of cycle equals zero utilization.  Your utilization is based on what your balance was when reported to bureaus.   If you used card and balance remains at time of reporting--that percertage is your utilization rate. 

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Excellent almost impossible

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Very few people attain excellent FICO  credit rating and those that do been handling their finances for decades.   In fact,  very difficult to go from good to excellent over many years.   Did you think 2 credit cards is all you need to get excellent credit score?   You have a lot of reading to do about credit scores. 

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because you dont have enough credit and you dont have varying types of credit. If you would read on your dashboard they tell you what you need to fix and how to fix it and what you need to do raise your score. 

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What do you mean at zero percent? Do you mean that they are zero percent apr? If you do, be aware that it does not matter what your rates are, rates don't affect credit scores, credit scores affect rates. If you mean that you have a zero balance, that may be part of your problem. You need to let one card report a small balance each month and then you can pay it off by the due date. If you only have two credit lines then that is most likely the majority of your problem. You need more than two accounts to grow your credit. You should really take some time to do some reading about what it takes to build a strong credit profile that will produce high scores.

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Pharkus

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FICTION.   You can have utilization even if you have zero balance at end of the month.   It depends on WHEN your balance is reported to bureaus.   HINT.   Report goes before due date by week or more.   So whatever balance on card when reported is your utilization.   Easiest way to be sure your utilization is between zero and 10% is never charge more than 10% on card entire month,  then pay off total by due date. 

Those with highest credit scores have utilization of about 7%.  If you have 2 or more cards,  utilization is calculated on total credit of both cards and balances.   BAD idea to keep tiny balance on card.   You will pay interest and some cards have minimum interest charge if you owe any balance.

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