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Accidentally opened a Belk credit card?
I accidentally opened a Belk card, thinking that it was more of a rewards card than a credit card. I realized what was *really* going on when the Customer Service lady told me to enter my Social Security number, but I felt too socially awkward/uncomfortable to stop at that point, so I proceeded to apply for the card.

I should've stopped her. I don't shop at Belk that often. What's done is done, though, I suppose. I can't undo it.

After doing some research, I found out that simply applying for the card already took a minor hit to my credit score. It sounds like I'm stuck with the card, too, as immediately closing it would worsen the damage.

I'm just a sad college kid who has never had a credit card before, so naturally, I have some questions.

1. Roughly every 3-4 months, I spend $20-$30 on makeup at Belk. Could I use my Belk card on the makeup and immediately pay off the bill to build my credit score?

2. Does Belk charge any sort of monthly or yearly fee, even if my balance remains at $0.00?

3. Is this the end of the world? How do I calm my mother down if she finds out?

Thanks for the help. :)

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Well yes, the damage is done.  But it does not have to be a bad thing.  This can hel you build your credit.  Use it for your normal spend at that store and you will be fine.  Dont know what you should tell your mom :)

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This is not a terrible thing if you have no other cards, this can be a good start to building your credit if this card is reported to all of the credit bureaus ( I am not sure if it is or not, never heard of it). Spend some time reading about how you should use a credit card, in addition to all other credit topics. The answer to your first question is: yes, use the card, but don't immediately pay it off, wait until the balance reports, then pay it in full before the due date. Don't use more than thirty percent of the credit line, less than ten percent is best.

The answer to your second question: I have no idea, you have to read the terms of the card, you can google that if you do not have any paperwork in front of you. Even if it does charge a small annual fee, the fee is worth it to have the card to build credit.

The answer to your last question: It is not the end of the world, but a beginning of a journey to build your credit. If your mother finds out about this, educate her on how this is a good thing and is a necessary thing for you to start building your credit for your life. Credit is important to have and you must use credit in order to build it.

I strongly suggest that you start spending at least one hour per day for the next couple of months to read everything that you can about credit, it will be time well spent as what you learn will help you the rest of your life. Any questions along the way, feel free to ask.

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