JetBlue Business Card review: Earn big when you fly

Business woman walking through the airport after booking a flight with her JetBlue Business CardImage: Business woman walking through the airport after booking a flight with her JetBlue Business Card
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Are you a business owner who loves to fly JetBlue?

If you don’t love flying with the carrier yet, the JetBlue Business Card might help you develop warm feelings.

JetBlue Business Card account holders are rewarded handsomely for flying. At six points per $1 spent on JetBlue tickets, the points-earning potential is hard to beat. You’ll also earn two points for every $1 spent at restaurants and office supply stores.

JetBlue sweetens the deal with attractive bonus rewards for new cardholders and annual “anniversary” bonus points.

What we like Heads up 
  • 50,000 bonus points when you spend $1,000 on purchases within the first 90 days of account opening
  • Plus, get an additional 10,000 points when you add 1 or more employee cards within 30 days of account opening and make a purchase with the card within 90 days of account opening
  • Earn 6 points for every $1 of JetBlue purchases
  • 5,000 anniversary bonus points each year
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • $99 annual fee
  • 15.99% or 24.99% variable APR on purchases and balance transfers, based on your creditworthiness

The rundown: Everything we like about the JetBlue Business Card

 Earning points

JetBlue Business Card users will earn six TrueBlue points for every $1 spent on tickets and other purchases made directly through JetBlue Airways.

Purchases you make in other categories will earn you points too. JetBlue gives cardholders two points for every $1 spent at restaurants and office supply stores. Card users earn one point per $1 spent on all other purchases.

With no foreign transactions fees, the card’s perks continue to look most attractive to the business person who spends significant dollars on travel.

New users also have ample opportunity to rack up JetBlue’s TrueBlue bonus points. If you spend $1,000 in purchases within 90 days of account opening, you’ll be rewarded with 50,000 points. And you’ll get an additional 10,000 points when you add an employee card within 30 days of account opening and make a purchase with the card within 90 days of account opening.

Each year on the anniversary of your account opening you’ll be awarded another 5,000 points as long as your account remains open and in good standing.

Business perks

The JetBlue Business Card has special business perks as well.

While some other business travel credit cards may offer free employee cards or the ability to set spending limits on employee cards, JetBlue offers both of these options, plus the ability to control cash access on those cards.

For further convenience, JetBlue provides a consolidated statement showing all employee purchases.

Heads up: What you should consider before applying for the JetBlue Business Card

It may not be the best card for all business owners, particularly those with little access to a JetBlue hub or a partner airline hub.

Or perhaps your business doesn’t have a lot of flight related expenses. For those who spend more on office supplies or gas, other cards may present better point earning potential.

This may not be the right card for you if your business has credit challenges or if you’re still looking to build business credit.

If you’re interested in earning rewards for flying JetBlue but not sure if a business card is the right choice, there are other ways to enjoy JetBlue’s big rewards.

The JetBlue Plus Card offers many of the same perks as the JetBlue Business Card, but for private cardholders.

These include the six points earned per $1 spent on JetBlue purchases and 5,000 bonus points awarded after each anniversary.

The main difference is that you’ll earn two points per $1 spent at restaurants and grocery stores rather than restaurants and office supply stores.

The competition: How the JetBlue Business Card stacks up

Delta SkyMiles® Gold Business American Express Card

More likely to fly with Delta Air Lines than JetBlue? With the Delta SkyMiles® Gold Business American Express Card, you’ll earn two miles for every $1 spent on Delta purchases, advertising in select media, eligible U.S. shipping purchases and restaurants. You’ll earn one mile per $1 spent on all other purchases. The card comes with a $0 intro, then $99 after first year annual fee.

From our partner

Delta SkyMiles® Gold Business American Express Card

See details, rates & fees

Bottom line: Is the JetBlue Business Card right for you?

The JetBlue Business Card has no blackout dates, no limit on points earned and no expiration date for points.

Even if your line of business doesn’t necessitate frequent travel, the rewards are noteworthy.

Unless JetBlue’s hubs are difficult to access, this card’s likely to be a good bet for travel rewards.


About the author: Sarah C. Brady is a San Francisco–based financial consultant, workshop facilitator and writer. In addition to writing for Credit Karma, Sarah writes for Experian, LendingTree, Magnify Money, MSN News and more. In her … Read more.