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RippedOffandMad

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Debt opened by someone else
Hello all. I have a bit of a complicated situation. A woman I was involved with some years ago open quite a bit of credit under my name. Of course, she did not pay and I am stuck with some negative marks on my reports. I filed a police report when I found out of the outstanding debt, but it has been some years gone by, and I am not sure whats the best way to handle the negatives. I would like to be as honest as possible but of course since she bought the items, and I am stuck with the bills paying in full leave a bad taste. I believe most are near the time when they should start falling off but not sure if they are resold if that starts the seven year cycle again. I don't want to open myself to renewing any debt so I figured I would start here before speaking to the debt collectors. I know they have a job to do and I am respectful but also vigilant about dealing with these issues. Does an agency have to so anything with my signature of purchases or anything showing I opened the accounts, or just mail me something with my social security number and a date the account was opened to suffice as proof the debt is mine? All of the bills I actually opened are all current, but these old bad debts really eat at me. She stole cash , wrote herself checks, opened credit lines, and left me with all the bills and none of the fun. Thanks guys for any input.

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Ripped Off

First question did she open these accounts with your consent? If the police acted on this and she was convicted in court as she should have been, I would dispute those items and send a copy of the police report as backup. That could possibly get them removed. If this is not the case, how old are there? They should fall off your report 7 years after the date they first went delinquent. If these debts are resold the clock cannot be restarted by a collector. The only thing that restarts the clock is if you made any kind of payment on them. Also depending on how old they are, check the statue of limitations in your state because the collector may not even be able to litigate for these debts although they can call or send you letters. If the statue has run out there is nothing else they can do. The first thing I would do is to dispute the items and request validation of the debt. Then send the collectors a certified letter asking for validation, a copy of the signed contract between you and the creditor (which they obviously cannot produce), and proof that they are licensed to collect in your state. Tell them that if they cannot provide all of these things within 30 days which you are entitled to BY LAW, they must immediately delete these trade items from your credit reports or face litigation for violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Do this and also follow up with law enforcement. I wish you the best in this tough situation.

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