Quick Tips for Improving Your Credit Health

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Quick Tips for Improving Your Credit Health

Just like physical health, there's no fast lane to an excellent credit score. It's a long-term journey. But just as you can start making healthy diet and exercise choices today, you can do the same for your credit.

Here are a few things you can try right now to help boost your credit health.

Task: Ask for a higher credit limit.

Possible benefit: Could lower your credit card utilization.
Approximate Time: 10 minutes
Tactic: Most credit card companies periodically review credit limits, but if it's been a while since you've received a credit limit increase and you have an excellent record, you could try requesting one. Calling up your credit card company might seem like a daunting task, but if it could help your credit health, why not give it a shot?

First, find your creditor's phone number on your latest statement, on the back of your card or by searching online. Explain to the customer service representative your reasons for requesting an increase. You'll likely need to provide additional personal information, like your income and employment status, to start the application process. If a phone conversation feels too intimidating, check if you may be able to request an increase through your online account or by visiting your local branch.

Watch out for: Sometimes, credit limit increase requests can come with a new hard inquiry of your credit report, which could initially have a negative impact your score. Make sure to ask first if this will happen so that you know what to expect and can decide if you'd still like to go through with your request.

Task: Write a "goodwill adjustment letter" for a past late payment.

Possible benefit: May remove a late payment from an otherwise good-looking credit report.
Approximate Time: 15 minutes
Tactic: If you've recently made a late bill payment when you're ordinarily on top of things, you could try asking to have that one black mark removed. In your letter, make a case for why the delinquency should be removed. Generally, you should describe briefly what happened, show what a loyal customer you've been and point to your positive track record before and after the misstep. You could model your letter after this example (make sure to personalize!) and wait about 30 days before following up, if you haven't heard anything.

Watch out for: Remember that your credit card company or lender doesn't have to remove the delinquency, so be prepared to wait until it eventually falls off of your report.

Task: Make a plan to pay down your credit card debt at a faster rate.

Possible benefit: Could lower your credit card utilization and reduce interest fees.
Approximate Time: 30 minutes to an hour to plan
Tactic: If you tend to carry balances on your credit cards from month to month, consider working out a plan to pay down your debts faster so you can get your credit card utilization rate to lower than 30 percent (the rate that credit experts generally recommend you stay under).

You can easily check your credit card utilization rate on Credit Karma to see where you stand. Work on the cards reporting more than 30 percent first. If you've only been making the minimum payments on those cards and are able to afford it, it's a good idea to increase your payment amounts so you can steadily decrease your utilization rate. If you can pay your whole bill amount, then you can avoid interest charges as well. You can track your spending habits by connecting your online accounts through Credit Karma.

Watch out for: While you're working on lowering your balances, try not to rely too heavily on your credit cards if possible. Otherwise, you could end up reversing all of your hard repayment work with new spending.

Task: Transfer your credit card balances.

Possible benefit: May strengthen your debt pay-off plan and increase your total number of accounts.
Approximate Time: 15 minutes to apply (then 7 to 10 days if approved, typically)
Tactic: When you have lots of different credit cards with varying balances to pay off, making multiple payments each month can seem tricky. There are several cards that offer introductory balance transfer rates, meaning if you transfer all or some of your other cards' balances, you'll pay little or no interest on those transferred balances for an introductory period (often a year or two). These promotions vary by card and usually come with a one-time fee, so always review the terms carefully. If you're interested in opening a balance transfer card, you could start by reading member reviews on Credit Karma.

Watch out for: In most cases, if you don't pay off your balance transfer completely during the introductory period, you'll have to pay interest on the entire transferred amount when that period is up. So this tactic is generally good for you only if you're really ready to pay off your credit card debt during the introductory period.

Task: Dispute credit report errors.

Possible benefit: Should result in a more accurate record of your credit history.
Approximate Time: 1 hour to prepare a dispute request (then usually up to 30 days)
Tactic: While some credit report errors don't affect your credit score at all (like inaccuracies in your personal information), others could severely impact your ability to get approved for credit (like inaccurately reported derogatory marks). Cleaning up errors from your credit report should be a top priority. Check out this step-by-step guide to help you through the process of addressing inaccuracies in your reports.

Watch out for: While some credit repair companies will tell you they can remove all negative information from your credit report through this process, that's often not the case. Accurate negative items on your report cannot typically be removed. Before you hire a company to help you dispute your credit report errors, read through these resources from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the Federal Trade Commission.

Bottom Line

In a world of instant gratification, it's natural to want a better credit score right now. Unfortunately, that's not how credit scores work. Your scores depict an overall picture of your financial health and habits, and it takes time to prove your discipline. Stay patient, and you may move up the credit ladder over time.

Editorial Note: The opinions you read here come from our editorial team. While compensation may affect which companies we write about and products we review, our marketing partners don't review, approve or endorse our editorial content. Our content is accurate (to the best of our knowledge) when we initially post it, but we don't guarantee the accuracy or completeness of the information provided. You can visit the company's website to get complete details about a product. See an error in an article? Use this form to report it to our editorial team. For questions about your Credit Karma account, please submit a help request to our support team.

Advertiser Disclosure: We think it's important for you to understand how we make money. It's pretty simple, actually. The offers for financial products you see on our platform come from companies who pay us. The money we make helps us give you access to free credit scores and reports and helps us create our other great tools and educational materials.

Compensation may factor into how and where products appear on our platform (and in what order). But since we generally make money when you find an offer you like and get, we try to show you offers we think are a good match for you. That's why we provide features like your Approval Odds and savings estimates.

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Credit Karma is really great job helping consumers. The information they give is dead on. Remember to leave accounts open (even if they are paid off) because for some strange reason the system penalizes you for closing the credit "availability". If you have poor credit get your credit cards current (do not close the account leave a zero balance) If you have not credit and your score won't allow you to get any credit here is some advice on how to make your score increase in 1-2 years. You can go to your local bank (most banks will do this) ask them if you can get a secured credit card. What this means (for those that may not know) is you give the bank 1,000.00, 500.00 or even $300 to open a Savings Account - ask them if they will in return give you a credit card for that amount. You can not take your money out of the savings - however, you have now opened up a credit card account and if you pay on time you score will increase. The bonus is that in one year if your never late they will send you the money you put in that savings account. So, now you have the money you put in the savings to use and you have an unsecured credit card. I don't believe that the amount you open the secured "savings account" really matters. What creditors or merchants want to see is that you have paid on time. My advice is to get 3 different types of "credit that are active and you pay them on time. Keeping your balance under 50% of the original amount that you placed in savings (to open the account) will help your score more. Ideally, keeping them under 30% of what your original (deposit to open the account) amount of credit is the best way to move that score up. A merchant that sells a washer or dryer for example, will often let you pay 30% to 50% of the purchase price and finance the balance even with poor credit. (Do no make a deal with the merchant unless they tell you that inspite of your credit they will honor the agreement to allow you to pay the 30'% or 50% down. *** It's very very important that you make sure they first make reports the credit agencies because some do not. In short, make them an offer, see if they accept and then make certain that they wil report your payments and it will show on your credit file. I had preexisting credit debt and found that current accounts being paid seem to be best path to increase your score. Your credit information needs to show you making payments and never being late!  Tip Never purchase a vehicle that is valued at the Kelley book or Auto trader retail value. Always buy a vehicle that is at or below "black book" or "wholesale" value. It will take some time to find a good deal but they are out their. Find a person that goes to a auto auction and purchases wholesale cars or trucks. If you take the time to find one (and you will!) very often you can pay him 200.00 or 300.00 for getting you an auto at below wholesale. Not only will you save thousands but every time I do this, I can drive that vehicle for a year, two years and even 3 years later and sell the car or truck for the same thing you paid. ***Stay away from Auto dealerships and never trade your car in. Sell your car to someone and you will get 30% to 50% more than they will credit you. The small lots that say "pay here" "buy here" very often you will pay 6 times more than the auto was worth. Very often, they may have as little as 25% in the auto (that they probably purchased at the auction) and by the time you ad that high interest rate they charge you for "on the spot financing and I promise you will often pay 6 times or more what the auto was worth. To many this information is common however, for those that do not know this will save you thousands - I hope it helps. 

One last note: Tony Robbins the inspirational writer and speaking wrote in one of his books that the

"Literal Definition of the word Power - Is having the ability to act.........

Credit Karma Team
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Thanks for posting! We appreciate your insight. 

Reply by
Soulsistia

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thank you, this is really helpful to me, I deposited 20,000 into my checking acct and 8,000 into my saving acct and borrowed against it was that a good move? I got it set up automatic draft out each month that gave me a even more interest rateEnter Your Reply

Reply by
Crystyl1116

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You're amazing. Thanks for that. I've read and re-read it. It's a nice brief 'go-to' as a reminder for what you need to do to maneuver within this system. 

The bit re: auto dealerships was particularly helpful! Thanks again!

Reply by
colprince8

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0 People Helped

My score is in the guter! low 500's and im doing what i can to pay down the debt  and get the collections removed. I have ZERO credit cards, and can't get approved for any because my score is so low. I dont know what to do.

Reply by
Noenglish

2 Contributions
33 People Helped

Thanks for the information.  There are so many things I wish I would have done 20+ years ago.  Regardless of that, my new approch to my credit worthiness is clear as glass.  Pay on time all the time, ask for credit line increases, and rule # 1 for me...never ever close an account thats got a zero balance.  Its like throwing away a dollar bill because you ripped it in half...tape it up and KEEP IT MOVING!

2 Contributions
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Garbage in, garbage out, Credit Karma  is showing up on my credit reports as I look at Credit Karma every day. And the time lag is enormous in credit reporting terms; Credit Karma is being given data that shows 90 day-old balances so even though I pay on time and my balance decreases, it does not reflect this. This is not Credit karma's fault; it is the fault of the bureaus or whoever is selling the bad data and it begs for a class action suit, afer all "seconds matter.' Time to reverse that attitude and go after the organizations that are profiting by lowering our scores, which means we pay higher interest. tsk tsk.. 

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I notice the same thing happening with me.  I notice that every week it's the same balances showing up and even though I make my payments I notice that it still shows the same. And we are talking about the balances are totally off by a couple off hundred dollars, then I notice that it shows missing data and what to do about it.  I've also notice that they don't waste any time reporting the amounts when you just bought something but as far as showing that payments have been made and owe way less or nothing?   And the take points away fro you, too but the fact is, that balance that they are giving us totally wrong. Also, acording to what I read on here is, they expect the consumer to chase them down to report the data.  I am not playing this credit card game, because that is exactly what it is.

Reply by
tammyjohnston544

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I agree with the Class Action Law Suit!

Reply by
kala1659

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ALOT OF COMPANIES POST MONTHLY AND ONLY TO ONE BUREAU AND WHEN YOU PURCHASE A VEHICLE, THE CAR LOT NOT ONLY TRY ONE OR TWO PLACES IT HITS EVERYWHERE AND THEN IT LOWERS YOUR SCORE, WHICH THAT IS NOT FAIR AT ALL..

Reply by
Sonicbuster

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Helpful to 1 out of 1 people

I agree!   I wish the government would get after these credit reporting bureaus!  I pay my bills on time, but have a lower credit score because of length of time/history.  ARE you kidding me?????  I am 66 years old and have paid off my house and tons of car loans and credit cards!!!! I took out a couple of bank student loans for the kids, 5-6 years in length, and according to Credit Karma my credit history is only 4 years long, and now a "poor" for this category!  Shoot me now!!!!!!  OR did I discover the Fountain of Youth?????

Reply by
nwalady777

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I've noticed that too.

Reply by
CurlyMeg

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19 People Helped

Do you not realize that Credit Karma is just getting a transfer of data? It takes time and when the companies you pay, take time to put it into their systems, it takes time to clear their's and then transfer to the credit agencies? Sometimes agencies only report once a month and even if Credit Karma looks every day, it will not show up until the company reports it to the agency and then Credit Karma gets it from the agency.

You have to remember that Credit Karma is a third party and they have to pull your information from another source which also gets its information from another source. Checking the report every day does not reflect any changes you made that day, week, or possibly even month.

For example, we sold our house in Feb. and it took until Apr for it to show that the house was sold and the account was closed. The mortgage company had to report in their systems that the house was paid off and then once that was cleared in their system, they reported it to the agencies during their monthly report. After that report was done, then Credit Karma pulled it into their system. So, it took almost 2 months for it to show in Credit Karma.

Patience is a needed when rebuilding credit. It says so at the bottom of the article. It could also take 6-12 months before you see a real spike in your credit score (as long as you continue to follow the steps and use the tools). Within 3 months, mine went from sub 600 to almost 650, by using the tools and following the steps.

Reply by
Rjsledz

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I feel your pain. Credit Karma is extremely late 

3 Contributions
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Helpful to 88 out of 91 people

I went from a thin file in late 2014 to a 650 score in Aug 2015 . I have been using all the tools CK gives you to improve your score . 

It takes time but it is important to follow the steps they provide and watch your score rise over time ! Thanks CK

Credit Karma Team
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Wow - glad to hear your hard work has been paying off!

Top Contributor

Reply by
njmack61

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Enter Your Reply  well we will see i just payed all my credit cards off but 1 ets see how long it takes them to report this i bet i do not see this for a few months if not longer like that one women said there right there to put something bad on you but when you make paymets it takes them for ever to put that on your report not right people not right at all

Reply by
toyato46

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I LIKE TO  NO SOME IF ACCOUNT IS CLOSE  CAN'T YOU REMOVE IT FROM MY CREDIT  CORE BECAUSE YOU HAVE REAL STATE ON MY CREDIT REPORT I DON'T OWL NO REAL STATE.

1 Contribution
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Helpful to 68 out of 69 people

I consolidated $8,000 worth of debt (various credit cards 2 small loans and furniture from Conn's) those payments before were almost a thousand a month, basically they were killing me softly. We'll with barely a 621 credit score with my credit union I went ina nd got the loan and they gave me a 13% apr for 4 years and lowered my payments to $230 per month. Plus my credit score went up like 30 points acrosss the board. So my recommendation to anyone who can consolidate do it now before all those late fees and high interest rates start to catch up with you and you're paying ober a grand a month like i did.

Top Contributor

Reply by
njmack61

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i don't have that much debt i just paid off all but one card i mean some were like 292 or 150 all little ones but there gone i have 17 accounts i don't need no more & before i got my taxes i try to get a loan i was trun down from everyone my credit score drop from 714 down to in the 6 hundred's don't remember but my back & lending tree all trun me down so some times it don't pay i have never miss a payment never late paymen on my report so i don't know what to do & thats the reason thay are giving me never had a loan it's crazy

Reply by
Timeisofessence

2 Contributions
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Helpful to 4 out of 5 people

I did the same thing. I just put the minimums I was drowning under together and they more than made up the monthly amount for the consolidation loan. AND once I paid them off, I got the credit cards companies to increase my limits to help my utilization. 

7 Contributions
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Helpful to 143 out of 154 people

Excellent article on improving one's credit. The various "tasks" was very helpful and informative.I have seen my credit score(s) improve from the low 600's to 680+ across all three credit bureaus since joining credit karma over a year ago.

Top Contributor

Reply by
CKCharmaine

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Thanks for the kind words about the article and our service! I'm happy we've been useful to you.

1 Contribution
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well credit karma, i paid off all my credit cards i even had one for 3,000 dollars once it showed up on credit karma as paid and never late and closed by the consumer i looked and now i lost 17 pts. on transunion and equifax exsplain that

Reply by
godisgreat11

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Enter Your Reply When you close an old account it will lower your score. keep your older accounts open but with low balances.

Reply by
crazyed1

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Enter Your Reply

Reply by
miiShaundale

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As  you pay off debt, you have to open new debt. Nobody tells you that. I learned that the hard way. Paid off thousands of debt and my score did the same thing. Opened about three new lines of credit and it increased, gradually.

Reply by
tengallonhat11

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Enter Your Reply  Same thing happen to me.  It's because the "age" of your credit history went down.  I had an old card from sears (closed, never late, paid off), but since it was closed 7 years ago, it dropped off, and lowered my score, by like 30 points.  Makes no sense, stupid, that i have worse credit risk because a 10 year old good account dropped off, yet the bankruptcy that is older, is still being reported. They do whatever it takes to lower your score.  Impossible to talk to any one or get explainations. I totatlly agree with a class action law suite.  Should have happen years ago!!

Reply by
emma1016

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0 People Helped

Have the same problem.

I notice when you say something nice about their article a credit karma team member always responds. But, ask why your score dropped signifigantly and you get crickets. 

Reply by
darren610

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1 Person Helped

Enter Your Replylate payments.

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Helpful to 37 out of 39 people

In 7 years I have paid off 2 cars and accounts were closed. I paid off 2 student loans and accounts were closed. I have 4 credit cards, 2 I have paid off and 2 I have paid down. No late payments. Credit scor has dropped over 100 points due to paying off. Cars & student loans.I'm getting bad credit for paying my bills on time. None of this makes any sense. 

Reply by
GraySS

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Hi, SoGitty it seems to me that we share the same story. I as well paid off numerous accounts in my credit score dropped and I was so confused because I thought paying accounts in full rise your score but this day in time it actually drops your score. However, paying on recent open accounts and opening new accounts is what raises your score now. I hope this was helpful to you. 

Reply by
PhilipChandler

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The solution is very, very simple -- NEVER CLOSE AN ACCOUNT, even after you have paid it down to $0.00.  Keep your dormant, zero-balance credit card accounts open -- this increases the total amount of credit available to you (a factor used in most credit scoring models), as well as lowinring your credit utilization ratio (another factor used in all credit scoring models).  So don't ever close a Visa, MasterCard, or store card account after paying the balance down to zero -- even if you have to eat an annual fee for some or fhese unused cards.  The more credit you have available to you to use (even if you do NOT use it and have no plans of doing so), and the lower your credit usage as opposed to credit available, the higher your credit score.  This general rule applies to everybody. Two years ago, I had no credit facilities whatsoever.  I opened four secured Visa and MasterCard accounts, and then applied to Capital One (this bank is the most likely to grant credit to persons who do not have credit or who are trying to rebuild their credit). I received six credit cards from Capital One, and every six months, I requested and received credit line increases.  I now have a FICO score of 749.  With each month, it continues to increase (at its lowest, it was a mere 691). I hope that this advice helps. XXXXXXX XXXXXXX

Reply by
CurlyMeg

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This is a reply to Philip
 

The problem is with cars, house, student loans, they are not revolving credit. So when you pay them off, they close the account as being paid off (whether in full or less than agreed upon amount). You cannot keep them open. You can open other accounts that can carry a balance in place of them with a credit limit, but when you pay off an account like stated above, they hurt your credit. Because they want everyone to owe and not be debt free (but you can if you have accounts opened and not use any of the credit).

Its a falicy of the system.

Reply by
Konabruiser

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1 Person Helped

it seems to me that closing the accounts is what's hurting your score....leave them open even with a zero balance...your credit score depends a lot of the length of time you've had established credit....

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I am a widow and did not understand how all this works when my husband passed in 2011.  I thought it would look bad to have potential to charge a lot so I canceled 8 credit cards (with $0 balance and payments missed) and kept my most recent ones.  So now I have poor length of history - just 3 years... Also, I made the mortgage payments on house, almost $4700/month, on time every month - from 2007 until 2012 when I sold the house.  Sadly, that doesn't count in determining length of credit history since the account was closed upon sale of home.  Any suggestions?

Reply by
1Joker9

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 Hello, I have a credit union Visa card and use it to pay most all of my bills on a auto pay. I then pay the balance off once or twice a month, whenever the balance gets close to $1000. Sadly I found doing this with Comcast doesn't work. Two months in a row they over charged me $150 and $70. I of course called and complained. They were supposed to give credit next month but didn't give me the credit due. I now have a bill due in two weeks that has a late charge added! I went to paper billing but they changed it to email without notice. We never got the email bills and had no idea of the change, so missed 2 payments. I'm thinking about filing a complaint with governing federal office.

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over 2 months ago my credit rating with karma was in the 800 now it is in the mid 700 why,I have paid off most of credit cards,does this reflect a lower credit rating with paying off debit ?

Reply by
blaqowl7

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Only if you close the accounts. closing the accounts will lower you availible credit

Reply by
JOSE1050

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Helpful to 6 out of 10 people

Enter Your Reply PAYING YOUR CARDS DOWN TO LOW CAN ALSO AFFECT CREDIT SCORE BECAUSE THEY SAY THAT EVERYONE SHOULD OWE 39%-49% I FOUND THIS OUT BECAUSE I HAD A HIGH SCORE OF 758 AND I STARTED PAYING DOWN MY CARDS IN ORDER TO RETIRE WITH NO UNNESSARY DEBT AND NOW MY SCORE IS 684 AND ALL ACCOUNTS ARE OPEN AND I CALLED A REPORTING AGENCY AND THEY SAID YOU SHOULD NEVER OWE LESS THAN 39%. I REPLIED THAT I WAS RETIRING AND SO I ONLY WANTED TO HAVE TO PAY HOUSE CAR AND ULILITIES SO I PAID ALL CARDS OFF. THEY REPLYED THAT IF I WANTED MY SCORE TO GO UP CHARGE MORE ON CREDIT OR DEAL WITH THE CONSEQUENCES!!! THIS IS NO FAIR IF I WANT TO LIVE DEBT FREE IT AFFECTS MY SCORE. :(

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I have 3 hospital bills showng on Credit Karma that are paid in 2012. I called all 3 credit bureas and none of them are showing up I also called the hospital and they have no record of the bills. Yet Credit Karma shows them as open????? and answers???

Reply by
moparmom02

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Helpful to 13 out of 15 people

Enter Your Reply  I would suggest that you check with the hospital's credit collection agency, it may be a 3rd party.  Make them release it.  They don't do it, automatically, and that may be part of the trouble.  Hospitals send to collection agencies more frequent now.  Best of Luck!

Reply by
Bonb83

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Helpful to 5 out of 5 people

I have same on  my credit rport  don't understand   why..  guess they do just whatever they want and  it's not suppose to be  showing   on thier.  no wonder people can't get anything. bureaus  seems to not care  just put whatever they want. 

Reply by
romansteel

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Helpful to 10 out of 10 people

Easily open a dispute via CreditKarma, then choose the "I'm no longer liable for this account" option.

They will do an investigation between the credit bureas and it will update your creditkarma profile. It's simple, easy and you should have a status response in 3-7days.

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