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DzdnCnfusd

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Letter requesting payment towards a removed collection
I recently sent a pay to delete letter to a collections company. Instead of hearing back from them in the allotted time frame that I stated in my letter (15 business days), they suddenly/quietly removed the collection from my account. One week later, the collections company sent me a letter requesting payment of the settlement price that I'd offered in said letter, saying that I can pay in the next 45 days.

I'm not sure if this is valid or not. Does this mean the creditor can re-submit the collection after the 45 days or that they think I'm stupid and that I don't know the item has been removed already and are still attempting to receive a payment?

Any input would be great! Thank You!

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Few things here...

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Collections can appear/reappear at anytime during the 7 1/2 year reportable period. Unless it was removed by CRA s after their investigations deemed the collections can't be reported under certain guidelines of FCRA, or its in violations with FDCPA.

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When a collection is removed, it dosent automatically means you no longer owe that debt, it certainly wont barring collection agency from contact you in collecting the debt, as long they do it with-in the guidelines of FDCPA and your State's collection laws.

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You need to find out what is the Statute Of Limitations, from where the debt occurred if you had moved since. You can be sued with-in that period for that debt. However, once it's passed the SOL? then you are no longer "legally" responsible for that, to pay it or not? It's completely up to you. (You should double check with such laws in your State just to be sure, after all I'm in no way qualified to give legal advice)... Just cover your bases, keep eye out for summons, collection agencies are known to sue people long after the debt is out of SOL, hoping people won't respond either afraid to or lack of knowledge, and they end up with a default judgment against them.

Top Contributor
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If you don't pay within the 45 days they have requested, I have no doubt your collection will reappear on your credit report. The date it will fall off will remain the same though--they can't change that. Collections fall off 7.5 years from when the original debt became 30 days late, period. 
Just curious, was the item supposed to fall off right about now anyway? I'm not sure what you mean by do they think you're stupid and don't know it's been removed. That was what you wanted, right? So fulfill your end of the bargain, or yes, it will come back.

By the way, pay for delete is not an ethical business practice for collection agencies. This violates their terms of agreement with the bureaus, and it's why most collection agencies won't do it. One estimate I read put the success rate for "pay to delete" requests at about 10%. Congrats, I guess, but that mark should really still be there, and having it removed is dishonest on your part. That's NOT how it's supposed to work.

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