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Question By
robertrocel

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How long does it take before credit inquiries are taken off your credit report?

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Soft/Hard Pulls

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Also known as a soft pull, this refers to an involuntary credit check that was not initiated by you. Things like pre approved credit card offers and account reviews use soft credit inquiries. They typically stay on your credit report for at least one full year.

Called hard pulls, these are credit inquiries initiated by you. There are many things that can result in a hard credit inquiry that you may not even be aware of. Most of us know applying for a mortgage, credit card, or loan will result in one, but did you also know things like opening a bank account, getting cable/satellite TV, or a new cell phone provider can all result in hard pulls?

With Experian, hard inquiries will drop off your credit report at the end of the month following two years. With TransUnion and Equifax the hard inquiries will fall off exactly two years later.

With soft inquiries there is no impact to your credit score, so they are not something to worry about. On the other hand, hard inquiries will impact your credit score – the exact amount of impact depends on a number of factors (which are not all public because the FICO formula is secret, but they have said there may be a greater impact for those with shorter credit histories and few accounts). It is often presumed that the higher your score is to start, the more of an impact a hard credit check will have.

Although the hard inquiries remain on your credit report for two years, they have the most impact during the first six months. After a year has passed an inquiry will reportedly no longer be counted in the credit score, but it will still be visible to those who view your report.

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They drop off 24 months

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Equifax vs. Trans Union

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What if the # of hard inquiries on my credit report are different between Equifax and Trans Union? Is there a significance behind this?

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Credit Inquires

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How do i get the credit inquires off my credit report

Reply by
Victoria999

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They will automatically be removed from your credit report after 2 years.  If you have a hard inquiry that was not a result of a credit request on your part (such as an application for a loan, credit card, mobile phone account, etc.), you can try to request that it be removed by the credit reporting agencies.  

Reply by
Crimson615

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Helpful to 1 out of 4 people

Victoria999, How can you request that it be removed by the cedit reporting agencies? I have a hard inquiry for a mobile phone account after the company told me explicitly it would not be a hard inquiry. 

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