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Question By
monkeybear87

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What is better: deletion or marked "paid in full"?
Does it look good at all on your credit report to have a debt changed from "in collections" to "paid in full"? Or should I just ask/pay for deletion? Do I have to pay for deletion or once the debt is satisfied can I dispute it with the credit bureau it was reported to?

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Deletion is the best.  If you can't get that a paid collection is better than an unpaid one.  It is also best to negotiation with the collector for a Pay Per Delete prior to paying rather than disputing afterwards, no guarantees your dispute will remove it from your report.  Make sure to get that in writing before you pay.  Hope this helps!

Top Contributor
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Deletion is best

Helpful to 10 out of 10 people

Definitely the best for your credit report is deletion of the baddy.  Addison is 100% right on, there are no guarantees if you pay the collection they will remove it, nor are they obligated to do so.

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Delete or Paid in full....

Hi all, I am dealing with this same issue right now. its about 9 small debts in collection, all medical. Would it be best to pay the total and have all 9 of them deleted from my credit report or is it ok to just pay them as I can without breaking bank, just to have them say paid in full?? Why is it so much more beneficial to have deletion done? Please anyone?

Reply by
iluvduelo

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25 People Helped

Hey shabah127,

It is much more beneficial because once you do pay em off they get deleted from your credit reports. Your score would go up tremendously. It'll seem as if you never had that specific account in collections. Again, the collections agency has to agree to it, and make sure you get it in writing before you make that payment. 

If you just get a paid in full, it'll still show up in your credit report as a collections account. It'll only help your score by a little and, if I'm not mistaken, it'll stay on your credit report for several years (7 years from the moment you last made a payment). 

Hope this helps,

iluvduelo

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PDF vs PIF

I have an debt with tmobile.  What is the best way to have this taken care of?  How do I have it removed from my credit?

Reply by
iluvduelo

9 Contributions
25 People Helped

Hey lrosep76,

These are the steps I would take.

1. Send them a "debt verification letter" first.

2. Once the debt is verified, send them a "pay for delete" letter. Make sure you have the funds ready to pay. Also, make sure that you get something from the collections agency in writing saying that they agree to it BEFORE you pay. 

3. If they agree to a "pay for delete", pay it. The account should come off after a couple of days or weeks. (If it doesnt, contact them or the credit report agencies)

Again, this is IF they agree to a pay for delete, I'm still having trouble getting some collections agencies to even respond to my letters. Good luck!

iluvduelo

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