What Can I Do About Missing Payment Information on My Credit Report?

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What Can I Do About Missing Payment Information on My Credit Report?

Credit reports are often lengthy and full of information. They tell the story of your history as a borrower, from the basics of your credit accounts to how you've repaid your debt in the past.

Depending on how many accounts you have and how long your credit history, there are potentially hundreds or thousands of pieces of data that can populate your credit report. The three major credit bureaus--Equifax, Experian and TransUnion--are responsible for collecting and maintaining this consumer information. Considering all of this, it probably comes as no surprise that there can occasionally be payment information missing from your credit report.

What does this mean for your credit, and what can you do to fix it? Read on to find out.

How can missing payment information affect my credit?

First of all, it's important to know that your payment history is one of the top factors influencing your credit score. (You can see how you compare on this and other major factors by logging on to Credit Karma.) Your payment history is basically the percentage of payments you've made on time. It helps show lenders how reliable you are in meeting your debt obligations. In a nutshell, the closer this percentage is to 100, the better.

When it comes to a payment that's missing from your credit report, the potential impact on your credit will depend on whether the missing payment status is negative or positive.

Missing negative payment information will generally have more of an impact on your credit health than missing positive payment history. A late payment can have varying effects on your credit, depending on how late you are. On the other hand, if you correct missing positive payment information on your credit report, it may or may not have an impact on your credit.

Why is it missing and what can I do?

Ultimately, it's up to you whether or not you want to make an effort to get your credit report updated. It's important to keep in mind that this particular type of update to your report may not have the effect that you desire. If you do decide to get your report updated, here are some reasons why your payment information could be missing and some next steps you can take.

  • Your creditor has stopped reporting to TransUnion. If your account has become inactive, your lender may decide to stop reporting it to TransUnion. If this is the case, you might consider contacting your lender directly or start using the line of credit again to make it active once more.
  • TransUnion has stopped sending us information. If you notice missing payment information on your TransUnion credit report on Credit Karma, it could be that TransUnion has stopped sending us these details. In this case, you may choose to reach out to TransUnion to ensure they're still reporting correctly on this line of credit.
  • There's some other data reporting error. Credit bureaus aren't perfect, and neither are your creditors. From time to time, they can get things wrong, and it's usually up to you to catch and correct their errors. In this case, you may choose to print out your credit report, indicate where the missing information should be and document any correspondence you have with TransUnion or your creditor.

Bottom Line

You've taken a great first step by staying on top of your credit and identifying a potential problem. Continue checking your free credit report regularly on Credit Karma to check if it's accurate and complete.

About the Author: is the Communications Manager at Credit Karma, where she's been since February 2011. When she's not writing about credit and finance all over the web, you can find her playing her guitar, catching the latest movie, training for her next race or just exploring the city of San Francisco. Say "Hi" on Twitter: @bhardeman.

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All Comments

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1 Contribution
171 People Helped

Helpful to 171 out of 180 people

K I think that the credit reporters (transunion,experian, etc... Should have to be held to a higher standard than out of date information , wrong info, if they are holding our credit life's I their hands then they should have to up to date within a certain amount of time.... To say oh well it's someone else's responsibility to let us know is unacceptable.

Reply by
coufalo

1 Contribution
42 People Helped
Helpful to 42 out of 43 people

Enter Your ReplyI agree.   I just looked at mine. They have 3 accounts listed as missed payments that are 100 years old, at one that is 0ver 30 years old.   You can bet I'm going to be contacting them.

Reply by
easymari

1 Contribution
20 People Helped
Helpful to 20 out of 21 people

Same thing is happening to me, a missed payment. Maybe Transunion should WAKEUP!Enter Your Reply

Reply by
showersoprano

1 Contribution
2 People Helped
Helpful to 2 out of 3 people

Enter Your Reply You are correct

Reply by
rose1854

1 Contribution
0 People Helped

 i totally agree with drkl !!!  the people should be held accountible for reporting in a timely manner.... we should not have to call lenders to ask for reports..... i had really bad credit but am trying to rebuild it...so thanks to the ones that do their  job, shame on the ones that don't do their job,,,,,,,,,

1 Contribution
27 People Helped

Helpful to 27 out of 27 people

Everybody needs to understand that all the credit reporting companies are for profit business they charge a fee to report the credit scores and information provided by the company's reporting this information. So because the companies reporting the information also pay the credit bureau the information must be accurate right..

banks and finance lending companies like these errors because they are able to charge a higher interest when people have a inaccurate report. Also credit reporting business make it difficult to dispute inaccurate information   this is big business legal coruption 

1 Contribution
42 People Helped

Helpful to 42 out of 47 people

I have 2 missing payments on my account, whice isnt true. i have paid them both off in full and one time.  So why do the show thye are missing payments?

Top Contributor

Reply by
CKCharmaine

512 Contributions
1071 People Helped
Helpful to 26 out of 38 people

Hi hhinkle, this might be due to misreporting or human error. You can try filing a dispute: https://www.creditkarma.com/article/dispute-credit-report-errors

Reply by
Cwm1979

4 Contributions
18 People Helped
Helpful to 12 out of 13 people

You should have asked for a document before paying off in full. ICan't recall what it's called, but it basically tells the lender " If I send payment in full, you will report that account as paid in full and closed, had you actually closed it. Otherwise it will always show the latest information, as not all lenders keep up with posting to the credit agencies

Reply by
DenniLynn

1 Contribution
25 People Helped
Helpful to 25 out of 26 people

I have the same thing on my report....IF they are closed that means they are PAID OFF.....so this hurts my credit...that's NOT fair

1 Contribution
38 People Helped

Helpful to 38 out of 45 people

I do not understand why my credit score went from 816 to 793, when i have no negative reports on any of my accounts. The 793 was reported by Esperian on November 21, 2014, but Credit Karma shows that my credit score is only 716. How can my credit score go from the 800's to the 700's when nothing negative has changed on my accounts. They are all current. Someone please explain this to me, because i am on top of my accounts, and usually pay off the balance due as soon as i recieve my statements. Needless to say I am very upset about the change in my credit score, and want my score back up where it was a month ago !!!!!

Top Contributor

Reply by
CKCharmaine

512 Contributions
1071 People Helped
Helpful to 8 out of 15 people

Hi MountainSunrise1955, we display a credit score from TransUnion, not Experian. There could be some differences in the information that they're reporting. I recommend that you check your full credit report to see if anything has changed.

Reply by
Noblepay

9 Contributions
63 People Helped
Helpful to 26 out of 29 people

Enter Your Reply     I have the exact same problem. I do not understand that if one buys a new car and pays cah for it, that there is even an account history started. I have 2 very old misinformed and incorrect account reports. One is from GMAC [2003] and the second is from GMAC [2005]. I paid cash for both vehicles. The non-accounts were opened and closed on the same days as the vehicle purchases and they are still showing up as accounts with missing info. WTF? I bought other new cars since and paid cash for those cars also They don,t show up. My current new car was puchased and partially financed in Sept. of ,14 [small loan at 0% interest],  everyone and their brother did a hard inquiry on me. I have made my payments on time but Credit Karma reports this account as in bad standing. CreditKarma. If you are going to be so invasive into people,s personal financial lives, GET THE INFO CORRECT!!!!!!!!!

Reply by
Nina2525

1 Contribution
3 People Helped
Helpful to 3 out of 4 people

Same thing happened to me and my husband's scores. I noticed that after credit karma changed their format, our scores actually changed. My went up and his down, even though there has been no changes to our finances at all. Have you found out anything regarding this?

Reply by
Cwm1979

4 Contributions
18 People Helped

Obviously you've used your "credit" for more than 30 percent of their value, it's not noted as negative history, just over extended which does lower your score.

Reply by
spidee16

1 Contribution
0 People Helped

EXAMPLE: Just say you have 5 credit cards at $1000.00 credit limit ... You have $5000.00 of (credit worthiness) and you are using 20% of the $5000.00....and you are making all your payments on time ( no negitive reports) Then you use one or more of your credit cards, and you are using 30% of your credt worthiness,,, your credit score is going to go down because of the % increase,, even if you have no negitive reports. Your credit worthiness, and the % of that worth used has a high impact on your credit score,,,

Reply by
rmthanna

1 Contribution
0 People Helped

If a creditor lowers your credit limit it can lower your credit score. Hard inquiries can lower your credit score. Sometimes the formula for calculating your credit score will change, which can also lower your credit score.

Reply by
consumerbroker

5 Contributions
0 People Helped

you might want to check to make sure there were no hard inquiries on your report.  I would call them and question them about it.  Always speak to a Supervisor not customer service they can't tell you anything.  

2 Contributions
23 People Helped

Helpful to 22 out of 23 people

missing payment history? why does mine show I have one, on a card I have had for 3 months, but have never used! balance does say $0, should I send them a check every month for zero dallors???? I do not understand???

Reply by
Cwm1979

4 Contributions
18 People Helped
Helpful to 5 out of 9 people

No, but it does look better if you use up to 30 percent of that credit monthly, or less...but always carry a balance and show payments to keep your credit score high/er

Reply by
frakshak

1 Contribution
0 People Helped

Enter Your Reply      sounds logical to me to send in a check for zero amount as that is what you owe.  that should stop their saying missing payment history.

Reply by
consumerbroker

5 Contributions
0 People Helped

The company you have a card with 0 balance can't report anything if you don't use the card.  You have to use the card to have the company report on the what you pay and how often.  

1 Contribution
46 People Helped

Helpful to 46 out of 71 people

Is it true that i can have all closed accounts over seven years removed from my credit report? If so how do i get that done?

Reply by
consumerbroker

5 Contributions
0 People Helped

You call or write them a letter telling the 3 bureaus to delete the entry immediately.   They usually take about 30 days in some circumstances but it shouldnt take that long.

1 Contribution
8 People Helped

Helpful to 8 out of 11 people

Can you have Aaron's retail report your good payments. So it will show on your credit report as good payments?

Reply by
little8angels

1 Contribution
0 People Helped
Helpful to 0 out of 1 people

My account for Aaron's didnt show up on my credit report until a month after I paid the account off.

Reply by
Cwm1979

4 Contributions
18 People Helped
Helpful to 1 out of 2 people

Of course not, because that is their way of extending you credit and charging more in interest and total value. They, like RAC...do not report.

Reply by
consumerbroker

5 Contributions
0 People Helped

Call the company that has a good report and tell them to start reporting on your credit report.  

2 Contributions
6 People Helped

Helpful to 6 out of 7 people

What I would like to know is how long it takes for collectors to get it to your credit reports that you now have a balance of zero or everything is paid off?  I have done this in the last few weeks and everything is still on there in the negative state and would like for it to said paid off or zero balance~!  Anyone by chance happen to know does it happen right away or take months?

Thanks,

Credit Karma Team
Top Contributor
2949 Contributions
4643 People Helped
Helpful to 4 out of 7 people

Hi KimmyK63, it generally takes about 30 days. It can be more or less depending on the creditor. 

Reply by
kittkatt2508

1 Contribution
4 People Helped
Helpful to 4 out of 5 people

i had one that was paid in full and suppossed to be taken off and hadnt for 8 months i contacted them again and they said i had to dispute with the credit union that it was filled through which was experian to have it taken off because they denied it after filing the dispute with them myself it was taken off in a week hope this was helpful

Reply by
Cmisbcry

4 Contributions
2 People Helped

Also Kimmy, you may want to contact the company's thierselves to get them to report to all agencys.  Most of the time they only report to 1 or the other.  Some/most chg. them to report anything, so they pick the lessor $ of the 3 evils so to speak.  But I would contact them directly and make sure they report a possitive report, but to all 3 agencies!

Reply by
consumerbroker

5 Contributions
0 People Helped

when your credit balance has been reported to collectors, they are hard people to deal with, I had to learn when your accounts ar in collections; before paying them off, you need to write the collection company before  you pay off your debt with them, you need to be guarantee that negative removal within 30 days.  If they don't agree with that then don't pay them.  I did the same thing paid the collections companies that held my balance  and they are still on my account today with a 0  balance but it remains for 7 years, so this keeps your scores down for next 7 years.   Sometimes you can still negotiate with them but not all the time.  You see, the bureaus have a lot to do with that also, I believe they tell them don't remove negative entry.  

1 Contribution
3 People Helped

Helpful to 3 out of 5 people

I have see that on my credit report that it raises one month then a couple months later its down why is that ? Also Would like to know what the plus sign means next to my credit score ..I see know where it explains what that means mine says my score and then PLUS 6

Top Contributor

Reply by
CKCharmaine

512 Contributions
1071 People Helped
Helpful to 4 out of 7 people

Hi littlerobin38, the plus sign indicates when your score has increased. While we can't pinpoint exactly why your score dropped, we've written about a few reasons why your score can fluctuates: https://www.creditkarma.com/article/MyScoreDroppedWhy

2 Contributions
0 People Helped

The reason I have missing information from one of my former banks is that I closed that account so there is no longer anything to report.  How do I fix that?

Top Contributor

Reply by
TeamCKJen

366 Contributions
559 People Helped
Helpful to 0 out of 1 people

Positive information from a closed account usually comes off your report after around 10 years, while negative information can come off sooner around the seven-year mark. 

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