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GreenMan383

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Background check reveals Chapter 7 bankruptcy over 15 years later???
I filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2001. Recently, I did a simply online background check on myself (I had to pay for it), and, to my amazement, it showed every detail of my Chapter 7 bankruptcy that was filed over 15 years ago! Employers frequently perform background checks when considering new employees. How can my Chapter 7 bankruptcy show up on a background check after 15 years? Although it no longer appears on my credit reports from all 3 bureaus and it no longer has any bearing on my financing, it does appear on a simple online background check. This is a serious setback when job hunting. Will my bankruptcy stick with me for the rest of my life?

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Credit report isn't end all be all when comes to informations about our Credit or backgrounds. Bankruptcy, foreclosure, judgement, eviction are matter of public records, they usually remain with whichever county's or State!s actual records for much longer than 7 years, it doesn't get expunged on its own and County/State don't do data purges often at all. I still can find my public records from 1996.

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Under certain cases, creditors can request your full and factual report, means everything Credit Bureaus ever had on you from day one. We often use the words like "deleted" or "removed" for items that's no longer on our reports, where in reality, its "included" or "excluded" in our reports, it's not really gone, it's just not be included as part of our report to creditors... 

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Per FCRA 605 (b)…


(b)  Exempted cases. The provisions of paragraphs (1) through (5) of subsection (a) of this section are not applicable in the case of any consumer credit report to be used in connection with 

 


  1.  a credit transaction involving, or which may reasonably be expected to involve, a principal amount of $150,000 or more;
  2. 
 the underwriting of life insurance involving, or which may reasonably be expected to involve, a face amount of $150,000 or more; or 
  3.  the employment of any individual at an annual salary which equals, or which may reasonably be expected to equal $75,000, or more. 






Reply by
GreenMan383

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Thank you, I appreciate your reply.  Now I understand why the bankruptcy appeared.  I assumed that, after 10 years, all records would be discarded.  Employment opportunities are scarce in my neck of the woods, and the competition is fierce.  With such large number of applicants, human resources have their hands full.  I read an article about employers' conducting background checks to weed out many of these applicants.  So, that was what prompted me to run a background check on myself.  I can understand employers' running a criminal background check, however, by doing so, I would imagine a bankruptcy would show up as well.  I'll have to keep trying.

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