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Question By
MichaelintheLBC

16 Contributions
946 People Helped
Should I apply for a Chase Credit Card online or in-person at the bank?
I've been banking with Chase since it was Washington Mutual est. 2003. I have a good repertoire with the bank: I have both a checking and a savings account and have been in good standing (no overdrawn accounts) for at least the past five years.

My credit score is "fair" at 661 (Vantage 3.0). My average credit age is 4 years with my oldest account 10yr and my newest 6mo. I have no collection accounts and a fair amount of diversity (student loans, car loan, credit cards). I also have 2 hard inquiries, most recent being 6mo ago. However, my on-time payment history is very poor at 95.6%, but it has been improving steadily over the past 3-4 years (NO late payments). Also, my current utilization is at 50% with a total limit at ~9K altogether.

With my credit profile and relationship with Chase, would it be more advantageous if I apply for in-person at the bank? Or, would it be the same as if I applied online through their "pre-approved" process?

Thank you in advance, Credit Karma Community.

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Most Helpful Response

Always go inside

Helpful to 1 out of 1 people

I use a credit union, but if you go inside dressed nice and look the part and allow them to go over your hisotry with them, I believe your odds are better BUT with that said, applying online can be just as good. It depends on what and how much you are trying to get. Too many other questions need to be asked for me to give you a proper response. When I got my car loan from the credit union, they looked at my income, my checks go to them every payday, they saw how far I have to drive to work, they called me on the phone, we had a conversation, I explained I did not WANT a car loan but I needed reliable transportation to and from work. They approved me. The payment was within range and they saw I could still afford my rent. They base it on your monthly income minuis your rent or mortgage and make a decision. It is not rocket science.

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Reply by
MichaelintheLBC

16 Contributions
946 People Helped

I understand debt to income ratio is a large part of it... I appreciate your effort and response(s).

Top Contributor
14 Contributions
48 People Helped

Update to my other response:

Sorry, I just read where your payment hisotry is poor and you are at 50%. You can walk in and do a song and dance all you want, they are going to be very cautious with you about taking out more credit with them, I would look for another source. What are wanting more credit for?

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Reply by
MichaelintheLBC

16 Contributions
946 People Helped

I think, I'll wait before applying.  It's probably in my best interest to pay down my current utilization, anyways.  My poor payment history is slowly, but steadily improving - that's one of the reasons why I wanted to add another account: this would help increase my on-time payments more rapidly.  The other reason for more credit was to compensate for an unexpected car repair that I had to take care of.  Thanks, again.

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