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jjc1988

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Large Number of Inquiries!
My wife and I purchased a vehicle from a dealership back in May and they told us they had to run the credit, obviously, but what happened was largely unexpected. From that one purchase we have 12 hard inquires for Transunion and 3 hard inquiries for Equifax. I don't know what Experion has. Is this something I can dispute? I think this is outside the norm, we expected our credit to be run once not a total of 15 times each.

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When you allow a dealer to run your credit they can & will check around with many places looking for the best deal for them & you. These mult inquiries will all report but get clumped together and are considered 1 hard inquiry total per bureau.

12 is a lot for one bureau but it's pretty normal, they are valid, & you gave them the authority to do this. Don't be worried...it'll be considered 1 inquiry.

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