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how can i remove public records that have been paid off?
I have 4 public records all many years old, 3 are old tax liens that have been paid off years ago. How can I get them removed?

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State Tax Lien Removed

Helpful to 7 out of 7 people

I had a state tax lien in the state of Georgia, and had it removed by 2 of the 3 credit bureaus

***** I want to preface this by saying that under NO OBLIGATION are credit bureaus required to remove tax liens at yoru request. Tax liens stay on your report for 7 years.

How did I do it?

1)  I paid the tax lien in full

2) Once this is done, the state revenue department will send a letter to the county in which the lien originated in, stating the lien is "Paid, Satisfied" (Personally, I drove to the state revenue department, and picked up the letter and brought it to the county tax office in the town that I live. If I waited for the state revenue department to send it my county, it would have taken a month or month and a half to send).

Note: You must turn in the letter to the county, but be sure to get a "SEALED" letter stating that it has been paid and released from record ($5 or $6 depending on your state/county).

2) Instead of waiting for the bureaus to receive the information that the tax lien had been paid in full, I immediately "disputed the status of the lien" with all 3 credit bureaus. This was done so that credit bureaus can immediaely update the status to show "Lien Release" or "Lien Paid".

Note: This process can take a few of days.

4. Once the status has been changed to "Lien Paid", contact the credit bureaus and 'ASK' if they could remove the lien. They asked for the "SEALED" letter from the state department stating that the state lien had been "RELEASED". (Again, credit bureaus are under NO OBLIGATION to remove liens at your requests).

State Tax Lien has been cleared form TU and EQ. This was done within 5 weeks time.

I want to say that I feel fortunate that TU and EQ were able to remove the lien from my report.

I hope this helps!

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Helpful to 1 out of 1 people

CLARIFICATION: What did I mean by "SEALED"?

I am referring to the "embossed" pattern (raised imprint against the background of the paper) of a seal that signifies that it is the original copy of a letter.

*Please forgive me if I caused any confusion.

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I found this online

Helpful to 26 out of 34 people

You have to keep in mind that your credit report is really your credit history. It doesn’t just show the way things are today.

There are three types of public records that can appear in your credit report: bankruptcy, civil judgments and tax liens. You don’t specify which is in your credit report.

Personal bankruptcy is usually either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13. Chapter 7 bankruptcies remain on your credit report 10 years from the filing date because you do not repay any of the debt. Chapter 13 bankruptcy is deleted 7 years from the filing date because you are required to repay at least part of the debt.

Civil judgments are financial court judgments. Basically, if you are sued and you lose, you owe a debt through the court. Therefore, the judgment can be included in your credit report. Civil judgments remain seven years from the filing date.

Tax liens are filed by government when you have not paid your taxes. Unpaid tax liens can remain on your credit report for 15 years from the filing date. Paid tax liens remain seven years from the paid date.

In each case, the status of the public record is included in your credit report. The entry will indicate whether a judgment is paid, a bankruptcy discharged, or a tax lien settled.

There are two bits of good news. The first is that the longer in the past the late payment occurred, or in your case, the longer the public record has been paid, the less significant it becomes in some scoring models. As a result, the older the negative information the less impact it has on some lenders’ decisions and credit scores, although it still will be scored as a negative item for as long as it remains.

The second is that the negative information will be deleted automatically at the time specified. Once it is gone, it will no longer impact your ability to get credit. Because it is deleted, you can rebuild a completely positive credit history. It just takes time and good credit management.

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Debt Settlement Request

Helpful to 2 out of 3 people

I resolved through mutual negotiations all past due collections. At the time I specifically made it  clear

that all accounts agreed on settlement would have to list Satisfactory Paid in Full. Am I correct in that

by requesting this I would not have this lingering on my credit for 7 years.

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Helpful to 2 out of 3 people

If you settled for less than owed, it will stay for 7 Years. I have one on mine.

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Helpful to 3 out of 6 people

i have the same things on my report.what do i do

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