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Question By
Jadu108

3 Contributions
1 Person Helped
Debt validation
Dispute to remove collection account

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Real question

I didnt understand how the post works, so my previous is lacking a lot of details.
So my question is...
I have two accounts in collection from 4 years ago, and 5 and a half years ago.
Both are under 200$. But i want to go about removing them sooner as to avoid possibility of legal action.
To be honest I dont recall ever recieving notices from either collection agency regarding this debt. (one insurance co., one medical related).
Could i simply dispute with transunion in an attempt to kill birds with one stone (validate the debt, and if not validated, removed), or should i contact the collection agencies, and request validation in writing? I dont want to reset the SOL, as obviously they are both closer to the end of the cycle. Im not sure of the best course of action do to fear of legal action, not having recieving notices, and not ressetting the sol.

Top Contributor
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1131 People Helped

You could try disputing them, you may get lucky and they may not have their ducks in a row and have to delete it. If you decide you want to pay it, try to get a "pay for delete agreement". I would not advise simply paying it, that would be foolish to not try to bring more benefit to yourself. Keep in mind that disputing it or simply paying it will cause the account to update and the update will hurt your scores if the account has not been updated in a while. You might also wish to do some reading on the FDCPA (fair debt collection practices act) to see if the collector is violating the laws in any way. If it were me, I would go the FDCPA route first if I find they are violating any laws, if they are not violating any laws then I would dispute them first and if that doesn't work, go for a "pay for delete agreement".

Top Contributor
269 Contributions
114 People Helped

I can almost guarantee you there will be no legal action for such a tiny dollar amount. Usually any legal action will come from the original creditor, not a collection agency. If they are open collections, I would try to settle for a smaller amount. Even if you settle for less than the full amount, it still becomes a closed collection versus an open collection. 
It's unclear from your post whether the debts are valid or not. You say you don't remember receiving notices from the collection agencies for the debts, but do you recognize the debts themselves? If you do, there's no point in playing validation games with the collection agencies. On the other hand, if you truly don't recognize the original insurance and medical debts, initiate a dispute with the bureaus about it, and they will investigate.

Reply by
Jadu108

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1 Person Helped

Oh i know them and i recognize them, i just know i havnt recieved notices for them going into collections, so i wanted to know the best action to go about handling them given how long theyve been hanging, and there are no noticea.

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