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nonoca09

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Charged off credit card, do I need an attorney?
About 6 months ago, my credit card was charged off. I did not know about this until I called my original creditor a month ago and they told me that they sold my account (they never sent me any letters that they intended to charge off my account). They gave me the name of the collection agency and their number. I looked them up on the BBB, and they buy accounts to sell to other collection agencies. This got me a bit worried since they have many complaints. I tried calling them but am always sent to voicemail. I got all of my free credit reports and none of them show me in collections so that is another problem since I don't know if that collection agency already sold it to another agnecy. I get anxious when talking on the phone so I am worried that will I mess up and my charged off credit problem will not be fixed. I intend to pay my debt so should I hire an attorney to help me? Am I getting too paranoid? Is it a waste of money and should I do it myself? I am worried and I want to pay off this debt before it is reported to my credit reports. I would really appreciate any advice! Thank you!

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You do not need an attorney and should not try negotiating any credit repayment agreements on the phone.  Always do so in writing and retain copies of all communications until the account is resolved.  If you should receive a call from a collection agency, just tell them you are unable to talk at the moment and request they send the notice in the mail, as is your right.  Then hang up.  If they should call afterwards, don't even answer the phone.  Caller ID is such a blessing.  But you do not need a lawyer to do this and you do not need to talk to anyone on the phone.  YOU have the right to handle this in a way that is comfortable for you.. 

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I don't see why you would "need" an attorney to handle this, but if you have fear of using a telephone then perhaps you may have to hire an attorney to speak on your behalf. Really the only thing that you need to do, is leave a voicemail message when you call this outfit and hopefully they will return your call promptly and then find out if they hold the debt or if they have sold it. Once you find out who you need to pay, get them to agree to not put the account on your credit reports in exchange for your payment in full. Make sure you are ready to pay the debt in full before contacting them and be ready to pay at once if they agree to not put in on your reports. If you call them and don't pay, you can bet it will be put on your reports asap. Be aware that you are in the position to keep the collections from hitting your reports, but even if you pay now it will not remove the charged off card account. You are being wise by wanting to take care of this right away to avoid it hitting your reports and to avoid being sued for the debt (whether you get sued or not usually depends on the amount of the debt).

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